Category Archives: Quotes

Murray Rothbard, “Diversitarian”

Murray Rothbard celebrates diversity.

“If men were like ants, there would be no interest in human freedom. If individual men, like ants, were uniform, interchangeable, devoid of specific personality traits of their own, then who would care whether they were free or not? Who, indeed, would care if they lived or died? The glory of the human race is the uniqueness of each individual, the fact that every person, though similar in many ways to others, possesses a completely individuated personality of his own. It is the fact of each person’s uniqueness—the fact that no two people can be wholly interchangeable—that makes each and every man irreplaceable and that makes us care whether he lives or dies, whether he is happy or oppressed. And, finally, it is the fact that these unique personalities need freedom for their full development that constitutes one of the major arguments for a free society.”

More Murray Rothbard.

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Possibly my new favorite quote.

“A cynic is a man who, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin.” – H.L. Mencken

Devin Stevens on the pledge of allegiance.

“Instead of the pledge of allegiance to the American flag, we should stand and recite parts of the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Declaration of Independence from memory.”

See more of Devin’s work here.

Devin Stevens.

Murray Rothbard – Education: Free and Compulsory.

More Murray Rothbard.

Voluntarism and Capitalism.

#CalExit.

Henry Ford on fractional-reserve banking.

“It is well enough that people of the nation do not understand our banking and money system, for if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning.”

The Federal Reserve in 5 minutes.

Murray Rothbard – The Case for a 100 Percent Gold Dollar. (I’ll try to remember adding more Murray pieces after I finish them).

Quotes.

H.L. Mencken quote

“The most dangerous man to any government is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos.”

How do we reconcile the value of being logical with things like human limitations (the eventual exhaustion of the brain, for example), and a human desire to be ILLOGICAL? (Or, rather, an ACCEPTANCE that one is illogical, but accompanied by a general APATHY of that as well: an acceptance that we ALL share to SOME degree or another in various subjects, simply because of our own human limitations, and our own individual desires, the source of which are impossible to pinpoint…) Is there an “appropriate” course of action to settle these conflicts?

The above picture pretty much summarizes my opinions about the stark contrast between mystical moralism and practical logic, and how fear of going to Hell provides an insufficient, malnourishing worldview, whereas true logic is a more effective perspective to apply to yourself, even if it does, say, contrast with certain Biblical Scripture.

Does that make me a hypocrite? For how can one avoid “mystical moralism“, apply “practical logic“, and still be a Christian?

For one, one must understand the difference between moralism and Christianity, which, as evidenced in the world, does not happen at’all. In fact, more often than not, the two are interpreted to be the exact same thing, from both conservatives and atheists, in that, in each of their minds, moralism and Christianity are the exact same thing.

But, they simply aren’t, and I wish I had more of a desire to dedicate sufficient time, energy, and care into constructing a written argument as to why this is the case, but instead, introducing this idea, even if it is not very in-depth, and will only justify in the minds of those I am criticizing that moralism and Christianity are the same, is simply as far as I’m willing to go in this topic, even though I know how erroneously misinterpreted what I am saying is going to be misinterpreted, and how I know how much vitriol I am going to receive from these groups, and well-intended inquiries I am going to receive from them that, once again, I simply do not have the desire nor energy to answer…

More logic.

Moral.

Christianity.

Free Will Contradictions.

Intelligence.

The Apparent Disconnect Between Thinking and Acting.

Economics.

Voluntarism and Capitalism.

Math.

Science.

Devin Stevens – The Fearful Sacrament.

A Philosopher’s Mind.

Highly Sensitive Mind.

Insightful.

Conserv.

Liberal.

Fem.

Willy Wonka strikes moralism.

“But Charlie, don’t forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he always wanted.”

“What happened?”

He lived happily ever after.”